Monthly Archives: July 2010

The Caves of Canalobre

The Caves of Canalobre are located in Alicante (Busot), Spain, 23 km to the city of Alicante and 50km from Elche in the north foothills of Cabezon de Oro Mountain. Once in the Cave you can see  shapes similar to: candelabra, jellyfish, organs or whatever your imagination produces. The fascination of the caves is not only the Sagrada Familia type of natural architecture but to be part of a place that preserves stalactites 100.000 years old.

Here are the photos:

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

You can see the full set at VCrown Flickr Sets

You can follow VCrown work at: FlickrTwitterFacebookVimeo

The Remains of the Day: a Mediterranean Conversation

A conversation in Cartagena.

These are some of the photos taken during my visit to Gabriel Navarro. Thanks.

Harbour Mechanics

VCrown©2010

Roman Aesthetics

VCrown©2010

La Mar de Música

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010
VCrown©2010

The Faces of Time

VCrown©2010

The Architecture of Now

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

Religio Perennis

VCrown©2010

Sea Conquerors

VCrown©2010

Above and Below, the Urban Landscape

VCrown©2010

Mediterranean Omphalos

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

You can follow VCrown work at: FlickrTwitterFacebookVimeo

Carthago Nova

Thanks to Gabriel Navarro

Cartagena, phoenician name “Qart Hadash” (New City).

Originally named Mastia by ancient ethnic people belonging to the tartesian confederation (greek: Τάρτησσος, latin: Tartessus) settled in Huelva, Sevilla and Cádiz.

First Document regarding Tartessians are found in Herodotus, V century BC where he tallks about Arganthonios The Silver Man who ruled Tartessia for 80 years 625 B.C to 545 B.C. Arganthonios had the honor to welcome Phocaeans, the firsts Greeks from the Ionian region to reach Iberia.

VCrown©2010

In 228 BC was refunded by the Carthaginian General Hasdrubal as Carthago Nova. Scipio Africanus, a Roman General, conquered in 209 BC. Julius Caesar gave the town Latin Rights and Octavian renamed it as Colonia Iulia Victrix N.C. in his honor.

VCrown©2010

In 298 AC Diocletian named it Carthaginensis. After the Romans Cartagena was inhabited by Visigoths 425 to 551, Byzantines 551 to 624, the Umayyads 714 to 756, the Caliphate of Córdoba 756 to 1031, the Taifa of Denia 1031 to 1076, the Taifa of Zaragoza 10876 to 1081, the Taifa of Tortosa 1081 to 1092, the Amoravids 1092 to 1145 and the Taifa of Murcia 1229 to 1245.

VCrown©2010

Cartagena was also known as Carthago Spartaria under Byzantine rule and as Qartayannat-al-Halfa during Muslim rule. It possessed one of the best harbors in the Western Mediterranean

Link of interest The Tartessian Languaje (below photo form wikipedia source, link)

You can follow VCrown work at: FlickrTwitterFacebookVimeo

Botanical Photography: The Architecture of Plants

Botanical Photography and the Architecture of Plants leads us directly to Antoni Gaudi and the nature of its Architecture. Base on the study of nature forms Gaudi is the best example of what nature offers to art and design.

Yo pretendo que haya poesía en mi vida.

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

Links related to Botanical Photography The Architecture of Plants:

You can follow VCrown work at: FlickrTwitterFacebookVimeo

Botanical Photography: Love Behind the Logic Wall

Botanical Photography and Love Behind the Logic Wall.

VCrown©2010

Links related to Botanical Photography: Love Behind the Logic Wall

You can follow VCrown work at: Flickr, Twitter, Facebook, Vimeo

The Fantasy of Prometheus, Polychrome

The Fantasy of Prometheus, Polychrome

Carthago Nova, Cartagena. Urban Sculpture. Conceptual interpretation of the original sculpture.

In Greek mythology, Prometheus (Ancient Greek: Προμηθεύς, “forethought”)[1] is a Titan, the son of Iapetus and Themis, and brother to Atlas, Epimetheus and Menoetius. He was a champion of human-kind known for his wily intelligence, who stole fire from Zeus and gave it to mortals.[2] Zeus then punished him for his crime by having him bound to a rock while a great eagle ate his liver every day only to have it grow back to be eaten again the next day. His myth has been treated by a number of ancient sources, in which Prometheus is credited with – or blamed for – playing a pivotal role in the early history of humankind.

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

Artistics retouches done with Aperture 3.

The Fantasy of Prometheus in Black&White

You can follow VCrown work at: FlickrTwitterFacebookVimeo

The Fantasy of Prometheus in Black&White

The Fantasy of Prometheus. Black&white

Carthago Nova, Cartagena. Urban Sculpture. Conceptual interpretation of the original sculpture.

In Greek mythology, Prometheus (Ancient Greek: Προμηθεύς, “forethought”)[1] is a Titan, the son of Iapetus and Themis, and brother to Atlas, Epimetheus and Menoetius. He was a champion of human-kind known for his wily intelligence, who stole fire from Zeus and gave it to mortals.[2] Zeus then punished him for his crime by having him bound to a rock while a great eagle ate his liver every day only to have it grow back to be eaten again the next day. His myth has been treated by a number of ancient sources, in which Prometheus is credited with – or blamed for – playing a pivotal role in the early history of humankind. (From Wikipedia)

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

You can follow VCrown work at: FlickrTwitterFacebookVimeo

The I Ching: Khien Hexagram

Photo Theme: Botanic Photography

The I Ching Complete, Hexagram by Hexagram with Floral Photography related to each entry.

The I Ching by James Legge, tr. Sacred Books of the East, vol 16, 1899

The Khien Hexagram

Khien indicates progress and success. The superior man, (being humble as it implies), will have a (good) issue (to his undertakings).

  • 1. The first SIX, divided, shows us the superior man who adds humility to humility. (Even) the great stream may be crossed with this, and there will be good fortune.
  • 2. The second SIX, divided, shows us humility that has made itself recognised. With firm correctness there will be good fortune.
  • 3. The third NINE, undivided, shows the superior man of (acknowledged) merit. He will maintain his success to the end, and have good fortune.
  • 4. The fourth SIX, divided, shows one, whose action would be in every way advantageous, stirring up (the more) his humility.
  • 5. The fifth SIX, divided, shows one who, without being rich, is able to employ his neighbours. He may advantageously use the force of arms. All his movements will be advantageous.
  • 6. The sixth SIX, divided, shows us humility that has made itself recognised. The subject of it will with advantage put his hosts in motion; but (he will only) punish his own towns and state.

VCrown©2010

Khien Hexagram Khwan Hexagram Kun Hexagram Mang Hexagram Hsu Hexagram Sung Hexagram Sze HexagramPi Hexagram Hsiâo Khû Hexagram

You can follow VCrown work at: FlickrTwitterFacebookVimeo

The I Ching: Tâ Yû Hexagram

Photo Theme: Botanic Photography

The I Ching Complete, Hexagram by Hexagram with Floral Photography related to each entry.

The I Ching by James Legge, tr. Sacred Books of the East, vol 16, 1899

The Tâ Yû Hexagram

Tâ Yû indicates that, (under the circumstances which it implies), there will be great progress and success.

  • 1. In the first NINE, undivided, there is no approach to what is injurious, and there is no error. Let there be a realisation of the difficulty (and danger of the position), and there will be no error (to the end).
  • 2. In the second NINE, undivided, we have a large waggon with its load. In whatever direction advance is made, there will be no error.
  • 3. The third NINE, undivided, shows us a feudal prince presenting his offerings to the Son of Heaven. A small man would be unequal (to such a duty).
  • 4. The fourth NINE, undivided, shows its subject keeping his great resources under restraint. There will be no error.
  • 5. The fifth SIX, divided, shows the sincerity of its subject reciprocated by that of all the others (represented in the hexagram). Let him display a proper majesty, and there will be good fortune.
  • 6. The topmost NINE, undivided, shows its subject with help accorded to him from Heaven. There will be good fortune, advantage in every respect.

VCrown©2010

Links to Hexagrams:

Khien Hexagram Khwan Hexagram Kun Hexagram Mang Hexagram Hsu Hexagram Sung Hexagram Sze HexagramPi Hexagram Lî Hexagram

You can follow VCrown work at: FlickrTwitterFacebookVimeo