Axis Mundi

Axis Mundi

Dendrolatry, trees as worship, symbols of growth, decay and resurrection. Germanic paganism and historical druidism have involved cultic practice in sacred groves, above all the oak. Popular stories reflect a firmly rooted belief in an intimate relation and connection between human beings and trees, plants and flowers as explained in the Egyptian Tale of the Two Brothers 1209-1205 BC

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(Wikipedia source)The Tree as an Axis Mundi: The axis mundi (also cosmic axis, world axis, world pillar, columna cerului, center of the world) is a ubiquitous symbol that crosses human cultures. The image expresses a point of connection between sky and earth where the four compass directions meet. At this point travel and correspondence is made between higher and lower realms.[1] Communication from lower realms may ascend to higher ones and blessings from higher realms may descend to lower ones and be disseminated to all.[2] The spot functions as the omphalos (navel), the world’s point of beginning.[3][4]

The axis mundi image appears in every region of the world and takes many forms. The image is both feminine (an umbilical providing nourishment) and masculine (a phallus providing insemination into a uterus). It may have the form of a natural object (a mountain, a tree, a vine, a stalk, a column of smoke or fire) or a product of human manufacture (a staff, a tower, a ladder, a staircase, a maypole, a cross, a steeple, a rope, a totem pole, a pillar, a spire). Its proximity to heaven may carry implications that are chiefly religious (pagoda, temple mount, church) or secular (obelisk, minaret, lighthouse, rocket, skyscraper). The image appears in religious and secular contexts.[5] The axis mundi symbol may be found in cultures utilizing shamanic practices or animist belief systems, in major world religions, and in technologically advanced “urban centers.” In Mircea Eliade’s opinion “Every Microcosm, every inhabited region, has a Centre; that is to say, a place that is sacred above all.”[6]

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