• Home
  • /Archive by category ' Gothic Art '

Archive For: Gothic Art

Gothic Convent and Cloister

Gothic Convent and Cloister of San Francisco, Morella, Spain,

XIV Century

(Wikipedia Source, Cloister) A cloister (from Latin claustrum, “enclosure”) is a rectangular open space surrounded by covered walks or open galleries, with openarcades on the inner side, running along the walls of buildings and forming a quadrangle or garth. The attachment of a cloister to acathedral or church, commonly against a warm southern flank,[1] usually indicates that it is (or once was) part of a monastic foundation, “forming a continuous and solid architectural barrier… that effectively separates the world of the monks from that of the serfs and workmen, whose lives and works went on outside and around the cloister.

Cloistered (or claustral) life is also another name for the life of a monk or nun in the enclosed religious orders; the modern English termenclosure is used in contemporary Catholic church law[2] to mean cloistered, and cloister is sometimes used as a metonymic synonym for monastery.

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

You can follow VCrown work at: FlickrTwitterFacebookVimeo

Up to the Choir

Up to the Choir

VCrown©2010

Architecturally, the choir (Anglican alt. spelling quire) is the area of a church or cathedral, usually in the western part of the chancelbetween the nave and the sanctuary (which houses the altar). The choir is occasionally located in the eastern part of the nave. In some monastic churches the choir occupies the western end of the nave and thus counterbalances the chancel and sanctuary. (Wikipedia, Choir)

VCrown©2010

You can follow VCrown work at: FlickrTwitterFacebookVimeo

Churrigueresque Retablo

Churrigueresque Retablo at SantaMaría LaMayor, Morella, Spain

(Wikipedia Source Churrigueresque) Churrigueresque refers to a Spanish Baroque style of elaborate sculptural architectural ornament which emerged as a manner of stucco decoration in Spain in the late 17th century and was used up to about 1750, marked by extreme, expressive and florid decorative detailing, normally found above the entrance on the main facade of a building.

Origins:

Named after the architect and sculptor, José Benito de Churriguera, who was born in Madrid of a Catalan family (originally named Xoriguera), and who worked primarily in Madrid and Salamanca, the origins of the style are said to go back to an architect and sculptor named Alonso Cano, who designed the facade of the cathedral at Granada, in 1667.

A distant precursor (early 15th century) of the overwrought style can be found in the Lombard Charterhouse of Pavia; yet the sculpture-encrusted facade still has the Italianate appeal to rational narrative. The Churrigueresque style appeals to the proliferative geometry, and has a more likely ancestry in the Moorish architecture or Mudéjar architecture that still remained through south and central Spain. The interior stucco roofs of, for example the Alcázar de los Reyes Cristianos in Granada, Spain, flourish with detail and ornamentation.

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

(Wikipedia Source Retablo) Retablo (or lamina) is a term for a Latin American devotional painting, especially a small popular or folk art one using iconography derived from traditional Catholic church art. This is a different meaning from the original one in Spanish, which still applies in Spain, and is equivalent to reredos in English or retable in French: a painting, sculpture or combination of the two, rising behind the altar of a church. The Latin etymology of this Spanishword means “board behind”[1].

VCrown©2010

Spanish retablos of the Late Middle Ages and Renaissance grew extremely large and elaborate, typically using carved and gilded wood, and rising as high as 40 feet or more. The tradition of making them was taken to the new Spanish Empire in America. There, by the late 18th century at least, the word became used for much smaller popular religious paintings, both conventional devotional images and ex-votos (paintings giving thanks for protection through a specific episode).

You can follow VCrown work at: FlickrTwitterFacebookVimeo

Gothic Art and the Militant Church

Gothic Art and the Militant Church

Arcipestral Church of Santa María La Mayor

Morella, Spain, Gothic Art


The Gothic Art can be defined as the Art of the Militant Church, as  Gombrich mentions in his History of Art.:

These powerful and challenging stone clusters erected by the Church in the lands of farmers and warriors seem to express the idea of the Militant Church, that is, the idea that here on Earth, it is the Church´s mission to combat the dark forces.

Regarding symbolism and ornamentation the Gothic cathedral represents a microcosm of the Universe. In one way, it represents the mathematical and geometrical nature of the universe in its  cathedrals with all their underlying logic and rationality absorbed by men. Secondly, its statues, decorations, stained glasses and murals relate continuously to the Labours of the Months and the Zodiac. It is oftenly argued that it was here, in the ornamentation, where the heterodoxies took advantage of their knowledge to reproduce allegorical symbols and sculptures linked to occult beliefs that the Church were against of.

The following photos show details of the Arcipestral Church of Santa María la Mayor in Morella, Spain.

NON NOBIS, DOMINE, NON NOBIS, SED NOMINI TUO DA GLORIAM


VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

You can follow VCrown work at: FlickrTwitterFacebookVimeo

The Dance of Death

The Dance of Death

Photos taken at the Monasterio de San Francisco in Morella, Spain

The Dance of Death is an allegory well known in late medieval times. In French is known as Danse Macabre, in Spanish as Danza Macabra, Totentanz in German and Dodedans in Dutch. Death is represented as a universal uniting Popes, Emperors, Kings, Children and Labourers.

VCrown©2010

It consists of a personified Death summoning g representatives from all the social classes to dance along to the grave. The intention of this allegory is to remind people of the fragility of their live and how vain is the glory of earthly life. In the Library of the Escorial you can see a manuscript from that era written in 600 verses where the Death is calling the Pope, the Emperor, the Bishop and the gens to be summon to the grave. The most famous artistic expressions are those of Hans Holbein the Old, 1538 and Heinrich Aldegrever, 1541.

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

VCrown©2010

The photos shown here belong to the Monasterio of San Francisco in Morella, Spain and are dated in the XIV Century. The photographs are of the originals wall paintings.

You can follow VCrown work at: FlickrTwitterFacebookVimeo