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The I Ching: Khien Hexagram

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The I Ching Complete, Hexagram by Hexagram with Floral Photography related to each entry.

The I Ching by James Legge, tr. Sacred Books of the East, vol 16, 1899

The Khien Hexagram

Khien indicates progress and success. The superior man, (being humble as it implies), will have a (good) issue (to his undertakings).

  • 1. The first SIX, divided, shows us the superior man who adds humility to humility. (Even) the great stream may be crossed with this, and there will be good fortune.
  • 2. The second SIX, divided, shows us humility that has made itself recognised. With firm correctness there will be good fortune.
  • 3. The third NINE, undivided, shows the superior man of (acknowledged) merit. He will maintain his success to the end, and have good fortune.
  • 4. The fourth SIX, divided, shows one, whose action would be in every way advantageous, stirring up (the more) his humility.
  • 5. The fifth SIX, divided, shows one who, without being rich, is able to employ his neighbours. He may advantageously use the force of arms. All his movements will be advantageous.
  • 6. The sixth SIX, divided, shows us humility that has made itself recognised. The subject of it will with advantage put his hosts in motion; but (he will only) punish his own towns and state.

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The I Ching: Tâ Yû Hexagram

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The I Ching Complete, Hexagram by Hexagram with Floral Photography related to each entry.

The I Ching by James Legge, tr. Sacred Books of the East, vol 16, 1899

The Tâ Yû Hexagram

Tâ Yû indicates that, (under the circumstances which it implies), there will be great progress and success.

  • 1. In the first NINE, undivided, there is no approach to what is injurious, and there is no error. Let there be a realisation of the difficulty (and danger of the position), and there will be no error (to the end).
  • 2. In the second NINE, undivided, we have a large waggon with its load. In whatever direction advance is made, there will be no error.
  • 3. The third NINE, undivided, shows us a feudal prince presenting his offerings to the Son of Heaven. A small man would be unequal (to such a duty).
  • 4. The fourth NINE, undivided, shows its subject keeping his great resources under restraint. There will be no error.
  • 5. The fifth SIX, divided, shows the sincerity of its subject reciprocated by that of all the others (represented in the hexagram). Let him display a proper majesty, and there will be good fortune.
  • 6. The topmost NINE, undivided, shows its subject with help accorded to him from Heaven. There will be good fortune, advantage in every respect.

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The I Ching: Thung Zân Hexagram

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The I Ching Complete, Hexagram by Hexagram with Floral Photography related to each entry.

The I Ching by James Legge, tr. Sacred Books of the East, vol 16, 1899

The Thung Zân Hexagram

Thung Zăn (or ‘Union of men’) appears here (as we find it) in the (remote districts of the) country, indicating progress and success. It will be advantageous to cross the great stream. It will be advantageous to maintain the firm correctness of the superior man.

  • 1. The first NINE, undivided, (shows the representative of) the union of men just issuing from his gate. There will be no error.
  • 2. The second SIX, divided, (shows the representative of) the union of men in relation with his kindred. There will be occasion for regret.
  • 3. The third NINE, undivided, (shows its subject) with his arms hidden in the thick grass, and at the top of a high mound. (But) for three years he makes no demonstration.
  • 4. The fourth NINE, undivided, (shows its subject) mounted on the city wall; but he does not proceed to make the attack (he contemplates). There will be good fortune.
  • 5. In the fifth NINE, undivided, (the representative of) the union of men first wails and cries out, and then laughs. His great host conquers, and he (and the subject of the second line) meet together.
  • 6. The topmost NINE, undivided, (shows the representative of) the union of men in the suburbs. There will be no occasion for repentance.

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The I Ching: Phî Hexagram

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The I Ching Complete, Hexagram by Hexagram with Floral Photography related to each entry.

The I Ching by James Legge, tr. Sacred Books of the East, vol 16, 1899

The Phî Hexagram

In Phî there is the want of good understanding between the (different classes of) men, and its indication is unfavourable to the firm and correct course of the superior man. We see in it the great gone and the little come.

  • 1. The first SIX, divided, suggests the idea of grass pulled up, and bringing with it other stalks with whose roots it is connected. With firm correctness (on the part of its subject), there will be good fortune and progress.
  • 2. The second SIX, divided, shows its subject patient and obedient. To the small man (comporting himself so) there will be good fortune. If the great man (comport himself) as the distress and obstruction require, he will have success.
  • The third SIX, divided, shows its subject ashamed of the purpose folded (in his breast).
  • 4. The fourth NINE, undivided, shows its subject acting in accordance with the ordination (of Heaven), and committing no error. His companions will come and share in his happiness.
  • 5. In the fifth NINE, undivided, we see him who brings the distress and obstruction to a close,–the great man and fortunate. (But let him say), ‘We may perish! We may perish!’ (so shall the state of things become firm, as if) bound to a clump of bushy mulberry trees.
  • 6. The sixth NINE, undivided, shows the overthrow (and removal of) the condition of distress and obstruction. Before this there was that condition. Hereafter there will be joy.

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The I Ching: Thâi Hexagram

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The I Ching Complete, Hexagram by Hexagram with Floral Photography related to each entry.

The I Ching by James Legge, tr. Sacred Books of the East, vol 16, 1899

The Thâi Hexagram

In Thâi (we see) the little gone and the great come. (It indicates that) there will be good fortune, with progress and success.

  • 1. The first NINE, undivided, suggests the idea of grass pulled up, and bringing with it other stalks with whose roots it is connected. Advance (on the part of its subject) will be fortunate.
  • 2. The second NINE, undivided, shows one who can bear with the uncultivated, will cross the Ho without a boat, does not forget the distant, and has no (selfish) friendships. Thus does he prove himself acting in accordance with the course of the due Mean.
  • 3. The third NINE, undivided, shows that, while there is no state of peace that is not liable to be disturbed, and no departure (of evil men) so that they shall not return, yet when one is firm and correct, as he realises the distresses that may arise, he will commit no error. There is no occasion for sadness at the certainty (of such recurring changes); and in this mood the happiness (of the present) may be (long) enjoyed.
  • 4. The fourth SIX, divided, shows its subject fluttering (down);–not relying on his own rich resources, but calling in his neighbours. (They all come) not as having received warning, but in the sincerity (of their hearts).
  • 5. The fifth six, divided, reminds us of (king) Tî-yî’s (rule about the) marriage of his younger sister. By such a course there is happiness and there will be great good fortune.
  • 6. The sixth six, divided, shows us the city wall returned into the moat. It is not the time to use the army. (The subject of the line) may, indeed, announce his orders to the people of his own city; but however correct and firm he may be, he will have cause for regret.

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The I Ching: Lî Hexagram

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The I Ching Complete, Hexagram by Hexagram with Floral Photography related to each entry.

The I Ching by James Legge, tr. Sacred Books of the East, vol 16, 1899

The Lî Hexagram

(Lî suggests the idea of) one treading on the tail of a tiger, which does not bite him. There will be progress and success.

  • 1. The first NINE, undivided, shows its subject treading his accustomed path. If he go forward, there will be no error.
  • 2. The second NINE, undivided, shows its subject treading the path that is level and easy;–a quiet and solitary man, to whom, if he be firm and correct, there will be good fortune.
  • 3. The third SIX, divided, shows a one-eyed man (who thinks he) can see; a lame man (who thinks he) can walk well; one who treads on the tail of a tiger and is bitten. (All this indicates) ill fortune. We have a (mere) bravo acting the part of a great ruler.
  • 4. The fourth NINE, undivided, shows its subject treading on the tail of a tiger. He becomes full of apprehensive caution, and in the end there will be good fortune.
  • 5. The fifth NINE, undivided, shows the resolute tread of its subject. Though he be firm and correct, there will be peril.
  • 6. The sixth NINE, undivided, tells us to look at (the whole course) that is trodden, and examine the presage which that gives. If it be complete and without failure, there will be great good fortune.

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The I Ching: Hsiâo Khû Hexagram

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The I Ching Complete, Hexagram by Hexagram with Floral Photography related to each entry.

The I Ching by James Legge, tr. Sacred Books of the East, vol 16, 1899

The Hsiâo Khû Hexagram

Hsiâo Khû indicates that (under its conditions) there will be progress and success. (We see) dense clouds, but no rain coming from our borders in the west.

  • 1. The first NINE, undivided, shows its subject returning and pursuing his own course. What mistake should he fall into? There will be good fortune.
  • 2. The second NINE, undivided, shows its subject, by the attraction (of the former line), returning (to the proper course). There will be good fortune.
  • 3. The third NINE, undivided, suggests the idea of a carriage, the strap beneath which has been removed, or of a husband and wife looking on each other with averted eyes.
  • 4. The fourth SIX, divided, shows its subject possessed of sincerity. The danger of bloodshed is thereby averted, and his (ground for) apprehension dismissed. There will be no mistake.
  • 5. The fifth NINE, undivided, shows its subject possessed of sincerity, and drawing others to unite with him. Rich in resources, he employs his neighbours (in the same cause with himself).
  • 6. The topmost NINE, undivided, shows how the rain has fallen, and the (onward progress) is stayed;–(so) must we value the full accumulation of the virtue (represented by the upper trigram). But a wife (exercising restraint), however firm and correct she may be, is in a position of peril, (and like) the moon approaching to the full. If the superior man prosecute his measures (in such circumstances), there will be evil.

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The I Ching: Pî Hexagram

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The I Ching Complete, Hexagram by Hexagram with Floral Photography related to each entry.

The I Ching by James Legge, tr. Sacred Books of the East, vol 16, 1899

The Pî Hexagram

Pî indicates that (under the conditions which it supposes) there is good fortune. But let (the principal party intended in it) re-examine himself, (as if) by divination, whether his virtue be great, unintermitting, and firm. If it be so, there will be no error. Those who have not rest will then come to him; and with those who are (too) late in coming it will be ill.

  • 1. The first SIX, divided, shows its subject seeking by his sincerity to win the attachment of his object. There will be no error. Let (the breast) be full of sincerity as an earthenware vessel is of its contents, and it will in the end bring other advantages.
  • 2. In the second SIX, divided, we see the movement towards union and attachment proceeding from the inward (mind). With firm correctness there will be good fortune.
  • 3. In the third SIX, divided, we see its subject seeking for union with such as ought not to be associated with.
  • 4. In the fourth SIX, divided, we see its subject seeking for union with the one beyond himself. With firm correctness there will be good fortune.
  • 5. The fifth NINE, undivided, affords the most illustrious instance of seeking union and attachment. (We seem to see in it) the king urging his pursuit of the game (only) in three directions, and allowing the escape of all the animals before him, while the people of his towns do not warn one another (to prevent it). There will be good fortune.
  • 6. In the topmost SIX, divided, we see one seeking union and attachment without having taken the first step (to such an end). There will be evil.

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The I Ching: Sze Hexagram

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The I Ching Complete, Hexagram by Hexagram with Floral Photography related to each entry.

The I Ching by James Legge, tr. Sacred Books of the East, vol 16, 1899

The Sze Hexagram

Sze indicates how, in the case which it supposes, with firmness and correctness, and (a leader of) age and experience, there will be good fortune and no error.

  • 1. The first SIX, divided, shows the host going forth according to the rules (for such a movement). If these be not good, there will be evil.
  • 2. The second NINE, undivided, shows (the leader) in the midst of the host. There will be good fortune and no error. The king has thrice conveyed to him the orders (of his favour).
  • 3. The third SIX, divided, shows how the host may, possibly, have many inefficient leaders. There will be evil.
  • 4. The fourth SIX, divided, shows the host in retreat. There is no error.
  • 5. The fifth SIX, divided, shows birds in the fields, which it will be advantageous to seize (and destroy). In that case there will be no error. If the oldest son leads the host, and younger men (idly occupy offices assigned to them), however firm and correct he may be, there will be evil.
  • 6. The topmost SIX, divided, shows the great ruler delivering his charges, (appointing some) to be rulers of states, and others to undertake the headship of clans; but small men should not be employed (in such positions).

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The I Ching: Sung Hexagram

Photo Theme: Botanic Photography

The I Ching Complete, Hexagram by Hexagram with Floral Photography related to each entry.

The I Ching by James Legge, tr. Sacred Books of the East, vol 16, 1899

The Sung Hexagram

Sung intimates how, though there is sincerity in one’s contention, he will yet meet with opposition and obstruction; but if he cherish an apprehensive caution, there will be good fortune, while, if he must prosecute the contention to the (bitter) end, there will be evil. It will be advantageous to see the great man; it will not be advantageous to cross the great stream.

  • 1. The first SIX, divided, shows its subject not perpetuating the matter about which (the contention is). He will suffer the small (injury) of being spoken against, but the end will be fortunate.
  • 2. The second NINE, undivided, shows its subject unequal to the contention. If he retire and keep concealed (where) the inhabitants of his city are (only) three hundred families, he will fall into no mistake.
  • 3. The third SIX, divided, shows its subject keeping in the old place assigned for his support, and firmly correct. Perilous as the position is, there will be good fortune in the end. Should he perchance
  • engage in the king’s business, he will not (claim the merit of) achievement.
  • 4. The fourth NINE, undivided, shows its subject unequal to the contention. He returns to (the study of Heaven’s) ordinances, changes (his wish to contend), and rests in being firm and correct. There will be good fortune.
  • S. The fifth NINE, undivided, shows its subject contending;–and with great good fortune.
  • 6. The topmost NINE, undivided, shows how its subject may have the leathern belt conferred on him (by the sovereign), and thrice it shall be taken from him in a morning.

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