Parterre Garden of Aranjuez Part 2

Parterre Garden of Aranjuez Part 2

1. Hercules and Antaeus Fountain (wikipedia source):

Hercules. Hercules is the Roman name for the Greek demigod Heracles, son of Jupiter (the Roman equivalent of Zeus), and the mortal Alcmena. Early Roman sources suggest that the imported Greek hero supplanted a mythic Italic shepherd called “Recaranus” or “Garanus”, famous for his strength who dedicated the Ara Maxima that became associated with the earliest Roman cult of Hercules.[1] While adopting much of the Greek Heracles’ iconography and mythology as his own, Hercules adopted a number of myths and characteristics that were distinctly Roman. With the spread of Roman hegemony, Hercules was worshiped locally from Hispania through Gaul.

Antaeus. Antaeus (Ἀνταίος) in Greek and Berber mythology was a giant, the son of Poseidon and Gaia, whose wife was Tinjis. Greeks of the sixth century BCE, who had established colonies along the coast, located him in the interior desert of Libya.[1] He would challenge all passers-by to wrestling matches, kill them, and collect their skulls, so that he might one day build out of them a temple to his father Poseidon. He was indefatigably strong as long as he remained in contact with the ground (his mother earth), but once lifted into the air he became as weak as other men. Heracles, finding that he could not beat Antaeus by throwing him to the ground, as he would regain his strength and be fortified, discovered the secret of his power and, holding Antaeus aloft, crushed him in a bearhug.[2] The story of Antaeus has been used as a symbol of the spiritual strength which accrues when one rests one’s faith on the immediate fact of things. The struggle between Antaeus and Heracles is a favorite subject in ancient and Renaissance sculpture.

VCrown©2011 Hercules and Antaeus Fountain

VCrown©2011 Hercules and Antaeus fountain

VCrown©2011 Hercules and Antaeus Fountain 3

VCrown©2011 Hercules and Antaeus 4

2. Cascade of River Tagus:

VCrown©2011 Cascade of River Tagus 3

VCrown©2011 Cascade of River Tagus 4

3. French Garden and Sphinx (wikipedia source):

French Garden. The French formal garden, also called jardin à la française, is a style of garden based on symmetry and the principle of imposing order over nature. It reached its apogee in the 17th century with the creation of the Gardens of Versailles, designed for Louis XIV by the landscape architect André Le Nôtre. The style was widely copied by other courts of Europe.

Sphinx. The sphinx, in Greek tradition, has the haunches of a lion, the wings of a great bird, and the face and breast of a woman. She is treacherous and merciless: those who cannot answer her riddle suffer a fate typical in such mythological stories: they are gobbled up whole and raw, eaten by this ravenous monster.[1] Unlike the Greek sphinx which was a woman, the Egyptian sphinx is typically shown as a man. In addition, the Egyptian sphinx was viewed as benevolent in contrast to the malevolent Greek version and was thought of as a guardian often flanking the entrances to temples.

In European decorative art, the sphinx enjoyed a major revival during the Renaissance. Later, the sphinx image, something very similar to the original Ancient Egyptian concept, was exported into many other cultures, albeit often interpreted quite differently due to translations of descriptions of the originals and the evolution of the concept in relation to other cultural traditions.

VCrown©2011 French Garden

VCrown©2011 Sphinx

4. Vases (wikipedia source).

The vase (pronounced /ˈvɑːz/, /ˈveɪs/, or /ˈveɪz/) is an open container, often used to hold cut flowers. It can be made from a number of materials including ceramics and glass. The vase is often decorated and thus used to extend the beauty of its contents.

Vases are defined as having a certain anatomy. Lowest is the foot, a distinguishable base to the piece. The design of the base may be bulbous, flat, carinate[1] or another shape. Next, the body, which forms the main and often largest portion of the piece. Resting atop the body is the shoulder, where the body curves inward. Then the neck, where the vase is given more height. Lastly, the lip, where the vase flares back out at the top. All these attributes can be seen in the pictures at right. Many vases are also given handles, though no examples are shown here. Today, the shapes of vases have evolved from the conventional ones to modern designs and shapes.

VCrown©2011 Vase 1

VCrown©2011 Vase 2

VCrown©2011 Vase 3

VCrown©2011 Vase 4

VCrown©2011 Vase 5

VCrown©2011 Vase 6

VCrown©2011 Vase 7

VCrown©2011 Vase 8

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