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Turning Pages: The Jazz of Botanical Photography

Turning Pages The Jazz of Botanical Photography

Turning Pages The Jazz of Botanical Photography 1

Turning Pages The Jazz of Botanical Photography 2

Turning Pages The Jazz of Botanical Photography 3

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Criptografía Cifrada la Mística del Número en la Flor

Criptografía Cifrada la Mística del Número en la Flor

Criptografía Cifrada la Mística del Número en la Flor 1 by VCrown©2011

Criptografía Cifrada la Mística del Número en la Flor 2 by VCrown©2011

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Cycas Luxury Botanical Photography

Cycas Luxury Botanical Photography

From Wikipedia Source Cycas:

Cycas is the type genus and the only genus currently recognised in the cycad family Cycadaceae. About 95 species are currently accepted. The best-known species is Cycas revoluta, widely cultivated under the name “Sago Palm” or “King Sago Palm” due to its palm-like appearance although it is not a true palm. The generic name comes fromGreek Koikas, and means “a kind of palm”.

The genus is native to the Old World, with the species concentrated around the equatorial regions. It is native to eastern and southeastern Asia including the Philippines with 10 species (9 of which are endemic), eastern Africa (including Madagascar), northern Australia, Polynesia, and Micronesia. Australia has 26 species, while the Indo-Chinese area has about 30. The northernmost species (C. revoluta) is found at 31°N in southern Japan. The southernmost (C. megacarpa) is found at 26°S in southeast Queensland, Australia.

The plants are dioecious, and the family Cycadaceae is unique among the cycads in not forming seed cones on female plants, but rather a group of leaf-like structures each with seeds on the lower margins, and pollen cones on male individuals.

The caudex is cylindrical, surrounded by the persistent petiole base. Most species form distinct branched or unbranched trunks but in some species the main trunk can be subterranean with the leaf crown appearing to arise directly from the ground. The leaves are pinnate (or more rarely bipinnate) and arranged spirally, with thick and hard keratinose. The leaflets are articulated, have midrib but lack secondary veins. Megasporophylls are not gathered in cones.

Often considered a living fossil, the earliest fossils of the genus Cycas appear in the Cenozoic although Cycas-like fossils that may belong to Cycadaceae extend well into the Mesozoic. Cycas is not closely related to other genera of cycads, and phylogenetic studies have shown that Cycadaceae is the sister-group to all other extant cycads.

The plant takes several years to grow, sexual reproduction takes place after 10 years of exclusive vegetative growth.

Of all the cycads, the Sago Palm is the most popular in horticulture. It is seen in almost all botanical gardens, in both temperate and tropical locations. In many areas of the world, it is heavily promoted commercially as a landscape plant. It is also quite popular as a bonsai plant. First described in the late 18th century, it is native to various areas of southern Japan and is thus tolerant of mild to somewhat cold temperatures, provided the ground is dry. Frost damage can occur at temperatures below −10 °C (14 °F) and there are several healthy plants that have been grown with little protection as far north as Nashville, Tennessee and Newport News, Virginia, both are in zone 7b. C. revoluta usually defoliates in this temperate climate, but it usually will flush (or grow) several new leaves by April. It does however require hot summers with mean temperatures of 30 to 35 °C (86 to 95 °F) for successful growth, making outdoor growing impossible in colder places such as northern Europe or the Northeast US, even where winter temperatures are not too cold. One disadvantage of its domestic use is that it is poisonous to animals (this includes humans).

1. Cycas Revoluta Male Reproductive Structure Cone

Cycas revoluta male reproductive structure cone 1 by VCrown©2011

Cycas revoluta male reproductive structure cone 2 by VCrown©2011

Cycas revoluta male reproductive structure cone 3 by VCrown©2011

Cycas revoluta male reproductive structure cone 4 by VCrown©2011

Cycas revoluta male reproductive structure cone 5 by VCrown©2011

Cycas revoluta male reproductive structure cone 6 by VCrown©2011

Cycas revoluta male reproductive structure cone 7 by VCrown©2011

Cycas revoluta male reproductive structure cone 8 by VCrown©2011

Cycas revoluta male reproductive structure cone 10 by VCrown©2011

2. Cycas Revoluta Female Reproductive Structure

Cycas revoluta female reproductive structure 1 by VCrown©2011

Cycas revoluta female reproductive structure 2 by VCrown©2011

Cycas revoluta female reproductive structure 3 by VCrown©2011

Cycas revoluta female reproductive structure 4 by VCrown©2011

Cycas revoluta female reproductive structure 5 by VCrown©2011

Cycas revoluta female reproductive structure 6 by VCrown©2011

Cycas revoluta female reproductive structure 7 by VCrown©2011

Cycas revoluta female reproductive structure 8 by VCrown©2011

3. Cycas Revoluta New Leaves

Cycas revoluta new leaves 1 by VCrown©2011

Cycas revoluta new leaves 2 by VCrown©2011

Cycas revoluta new leaves 3 by VCrown©2011

Cycas revoluta new leaves 4 by VCrown©2011

Cycas revoluta new leaves 5 by VCrown©2011

Cycas revoluta new leaves 6 by VCrown©2011

Cycas revoluta new leaves 7 by VCrown©2011

Cycas revoluta new leaves 8 by VCrown©2011

Cycas revoluta new leaves 11 by VCrown©2011

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Retratos Florales El Zen de la Vida

Retratos Florales El Zen de la Vida

La Mente Original o honshin; La Mente de un Niño o akago no kokoro; El Hombre Verdarero o shinjin; El Hombre Perfecto o shijin; El Rostro Original o honrai no memmoku.

“Cuando el discernimiento justo es alcanzado y no se le obstruye, se aplica a cualquier cosa, incluyendo la esgrima. La gente ordinaria está preocupada por los nombres. Tan pronto como oyen un nombre aparece una discriminación en sus mentes. El que ten una mirada justa ve cada objeto en su propia luz. Cuando ve la espada, sabe al instante la forma en que opera. Se enfrenta a la multiplicidad de las cosas y no es confundido. Daisetz T. Suzuki, El Zen y la Cultura Japonesa.

Retratos Florales El Zen de la Vida 1 by VCrown©2011

Retratos Florales El Zen de la Vida 2 by VCrown©2011

Retratos Florales El Zen de la Vida 3 by VCrown©2011

Retratos Florales El Zen de la Vida 4 by VCrown©2011

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Floral Portraits The Zen of Life

Floral Portraits The Zen of Life

The Original Mind or honshin; the Mind of a Child or akago no kokoro; The True Man or shinjin; The Perfect Man or shin; The Original Face or honrai no memmoku.

“When the right insight is achieved and is not blocked, it applies to anything, including fencing. Ordinary people are worried about the names. As soon as they hear a name a discrimination appears in their minds. He who has fair look sees every object in its own light. When he sees the sword, he knows instantly how it operates. He faces a multiplicity of things and is not confused”. Daisetz T. Suzuki, Zen and Japanese Culture

Floral Portraits The Zen of Life 1 by VCrown©2011

Floral Portraits The Zen of Life 2 by VCrown©2011

Floral Portraits The Zen of Life 3 by VCrown©2011

Floral Portraits The Zen of Life 4 by VCrown©2011

Floral Portraits The Zen of Life 5 by VCrown©2011

Floral Portraits The Zen of Life 6 by VCrown©2011

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Anatomy of Floral Movement and Emotions

Anatomy of Floral Movement and Emotions

Anatomy of flora. Understanding micro life and its quantum representation.

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Ficus Elastica: Botanical Photography

Ficus Elastica: Botanical Photography

Source: Ficus Elastica, wikipedia text

Ficus elastica, also called the rubber figrubber bushrubber plant, or Indian rubber bush is a species of plant in the fig genus, native to northeast India and southern Indonesia.

Author Franz Eugen Köhler, Köhler's Medizinal-Pflanzen 1887

It is a fat bush in the banyan group of figs, growing to 30–40 metres (98–130 ft) (rarely up to 60 metres / 200 feet) tall, with a stout trunk up to 2 metres (6.6 ft) diameter. The trunk develops aerial and buttressing roots to anchor it in the soil and help support heavy branches. It has broad shiny oval leaves 10–35 centimetres (3.9–14 in) long and 5–15 centimetres (2.0–5.9 in) broad; leaf size is largest on young plants (occasionally to 45 centimetres / 18 inches long), much smaller on old trees (typically 10 centimetres / 3.9 inches long). The leaves develop inside a sheath at the apical meristem, which grows larger as the new leaf develops. When it is mature, it unfurls and the sheath drops off the plant. Inside the new leaf, another immature leaf is waiting to develop.

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As with other members of the genus Ficus, the flowers require a particular species of fig wasp to pollinate it in a co-evolved relationship. Because of this relationship, the rubber plant does not produce highly colourful or fragrant flowers to attract other pollinators. The fruit is a small yellow-green oval fig 1 centimetre (0.39 in) long, barely edible; it will only contain viable seed where the relevant fig wasp species is present.

In parts of India, people guide the roots of the tree over chasms to eventually form living bridges[

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CULTIVATION AND USES

Ficus elastica is grown around the world as an ornamental plant, outside in frost-free climates from the tropical to the Mediterranean and inside in colder climates as a houseplant. Although it is grown in Hawaiʻi, the species of fig wasp required to allow it to spread naturally is not present there.

In cultivation, it prefers bright sunlight but not hot temperatures. It has a high tolerance for drought, but prefers humidity and thrives in wet, tropical conditions. When grown as an ornamental plant hybrids derived from Ficus elastica Robusta with broader, stiffer and more upright leaves are commonly used instead of the wild form. Many such forms exist, often with variegated leaves.

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Most cultivated plants are produced by asexual propagation. This can be done by planting cuttings or air layering. The latter method requires the propagator to cut a slit in the plant’s stem. The wound, which oozes with the plant’s latex sap, is packed with rooting hormoneand wrapped tightly with moist sphagnum moss. The whole structure is wrapped in plastic and left for a few months. When it is unwrapped, new roots have developed from the plant’s auxiliary buds. The stem is severed and the new plant is potted on its own.

It can yield a milky white latex also known as sap, which has been used in some cases to make rubber, but it should not be confused with the Pará rubber tree, the main commercial source of latex for rubber making. This sap is also an irritant to the eyes and skin and can be fatal if taken internally.

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Botanical and Horticulture Photography PALM SYMBOLISM 4

Botanical and Horticulture Photography PALM SYMBOLISM 4

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19. In this same edition of the Biblia Pauperum

the palm is also, strangely enough, placed in

the hand of Christ in the Ecce Homo; the reed

in His right hand set there in mockery, changed

to the victor’s palm.

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20. Occasionally the palm is given to the angel

Gabriel when he comes from Heaven to announce

the Saviour’s approaching birth. “Ave” is

his salutation to the Virgin, and in Roman

fashion, as in salutation to a queen, he kneels

with a lifted palm.

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21. Spinello Aretino paints Gabriel with the

palm. In his Annunciation at Arezzo ‘ the

angel is first seen above, flying with the palm

from before God’s throne. Below he kneels,

the palm in his hand, before the Virgin. Ambrogio

Lorenzetti and others follow the same

tradition, but the palm was soon superseded

in Siena by the olive and elsewhere by the lily,

which was adopted by painters of all nations as

the flower of the Annunciation.

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22. The Legenda Aurea of Jacobus de Voragine

gives an account of the death and burial of the

Virgin. The legend is said to be an invention

of the Gnostics, and there is reason to believe

of Lencius in the second century.

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23. Shortly before the Virgin’s death the angel

Gabriel again appeared to her, and he gave

her a branch of palm from Paradise which he

commanded should be borne before her bier.

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24. This branch of palm was clearly the symbol

of victory over sin, since she had passed a full

lifetime in perfect sinlessness and her surpassing

sorrows had entitled her to the reward of

martyrdom.

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25. The Legend continues: “And the palm shone which he had left

behind with great clearness; it was green like

a natural branch and its leaves shimmered like

the morning star”. The palm, therefore, is

distinguished from the palms of the martyrs

by being encircled with stars. A Sienese artist

paints seven, the sacred number, corresponding

with the Virgin’s sorrows; other artists

give twelve, foreshadowing that there should be

upon her head a crown of twelve stars.

26. Usually, in Italian pictures of the death or

Dormition of the Virgin, an angel, or Saint John

the Evangelist, appears at her bedside carrying

the palm. Northern art was almost entirely

uninfluenced by the details given by Jacobus

de Voragine of the Virgin’s death and burial,

and though in Germany The Death of the

Virgin is a very favourite subject, the palm is

never introduced. Saint John frequently, however,

holds a lighted taper, and some form of

the starry palm tradition may have drifted

northwards, for the master of the Sterzing Altar

paints a cluster of star-shaped flowers in the

hand of Saint John, who bends over the inanimate

form of the Virgin.

27. Her body was carried by divine command

to the valley of Jehoshaphat, and John bare

the palm branch in front of it.

28. This scene, too, belongs to Italian art, and

usually makes a beautiful processional group.

Saint John, with the privilege of a son, walks

before the bier. Duccio di Buoninsegna paints

him with the closed narrow palm of a martyr.

In the charming little long-shaped picture by

Fra Angelico the palm has its fan-shaped

leaves spread wide and it shines as if it were of

gold.

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29. In the Immaculate Conception

of the Spanish school one of the attendant putti usually

carries a palm. This may be the palm of victory

over sin and death, or, following another

authority, it may be a symbol of the Immaculate

Conception, since it bears fruit at the same

moment at which it flowers.

30. According to Dr Anselm Salzer, O.S.B.,

The palm, when referring to Mary, is a figure

of her victory over the world and its temptations,

of her everlasting virtue, of her sovereignty

in heaven, of the protection that she offers to

mankind, of her triumphant motherhood and

of the beauty of her soul.

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