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The I Ching: Khien Hexagram

Photo Theme: Botanic Photography

The I Ching Complete, Hexagram by Hexagram with Floral Photography related to each entry.

The I Ching by James Legge, tr. Sacred Books of the East, vol 16, 1899

The Khien Hexagram

Khien indicates progress and success. The superior man, (being humble as it implies), will have a (good) issue (to his undertakings).

  • 1. The first SIX, divided, shows us the superior man who adds humility to humility. (Even) the great stream may be crossed with this, and there will be good fortune.
  • 2. The second SIX, divided, shows us humility that has made itself recognised. With firm correctness there will be good fortune.
  • 3. The third NINE, undivided, shows the superior man of (acknowledged) merit. He will maintain his success to the end, and have good fortune.
  • 4. The fourth SIX, divided, shows one, whose action would be in every way advantageous, stirring up (the more) his humility.
  • 5. The fifth SIX, divided, shows one who, without being rich, is able to employ his neighbours. He may advantageously use the force of arms. All his movements will be advantageous.
  • 6. The sixth SIX, divided, shows us humility that has made itself recognised. The subject of it will with advantage put his hosts in motion; but (he will only) punish his own towns and state.

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Khien Hexagram Khwan Hexagram Kun Hexagram Mang Hexagram Hsu Hexagram Sung Hexagram Sze HexagramPi Hexagram Hsiâo Khû Hexagram

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The I Ching: Khien Hexagram

The I Ching Complete, Hexagram by Hexagram with Floral Photography related to each entry.

The I Ching by James Legge, tr. Sacred Books of the East, vol 16, 1899

The Khien Hexagram

Explanation of the entire figure by king Wăn

Khien (represents) what is great and originating, penetrating, advantageous, correct and firm.

Explanation of the separate lines by the duke of Kâu.

  • 1. In the first (or lowest) NINE, undivided, (we see its subject as) the dragon lying hid (in the deep). It is not the time for active doing.
  • 2. In the second NINE, undivided, (we see its subject as) the dragon appearing in the field. It will be advantageous to meet with the great man.
  • 3. In the third NINE, undivided, (we see its subject as) the superior man active and vigilant all the day, and in the evening still careful and apprehensive. (The position is) dangerous, but there will be no mistake.
  • 4. In the fourth NINE, undivided, (we see its subject as the dragon looking) as if he were leaping up, but still in the deep. There will be no mistake.
  • 5. In the fifth NINE, undivided, (we see its subject as) the dragon on the wing in the sky. It will be advantageous to meet with the great man.
  • 6. In the sixth (or topmost) NINE, undivided, (we see its subject as) the dragon exceeding the proper limits. There will be occasion for repentance.
  • 7. (The lines of this hexagram are all strong and undivided, as appears from) the use of the number NINE. If the host of dragons (thus) appearing were to divest themselves of their heads, there would be good fortune.

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