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The I Ching: Sze Hexagram

Photo Theme: Botanic Photography

The I Ching Complete, Hexagram by Hexagram with Floral Photography related to each entry.

The I Ching by James Legge, tr. Sacred Books of the East, vol 16, 1899

The Sze Hexagram

Sze indicates how, in the case which it supposes, with firmness and correctness, and (a leader of) age and experience, there will be good fortune and no error.

  • 1. The first SIX, divided, shows the host going forth according to the rules (for such a movement). If these be not good, there will be evil.
  • 2. The second NINE, undivided, shows (the leader) in the midst of the host. There will be good fortune and no error. The king has thrice conveyed to him the orders (of his favour).
  • 3. The third SIX, divided, shows how the host may, possibly, have many inefficient leaders. There will be evil.
  • 4. The fourth SIX, divided, shows the host in retreat. There is no error.
  • 5. The fifth SIX, divided, shows birds in the fields, which it will be advantageous to seize (and destroy). In that case there will be no error. If the oldest son leads the host, and younger men (idly occupy offices assigned to them), however firm and correct he may be, there will be evil.
  • 6. The topmost SIX, divided, shows the great ruler delivering his charges, (appointing some) to be rulers of states, and others to undertake the headship of clans; but small men should not be employed (in such positions).

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The I Ching: Khien Hexagram The I Ching: Khwân Hexagram The I Ching: Kun Hexagram The I Ching: Mang Hexagram The I Ching: Sung Hexagram

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The I Ching: Sung Hexagram

Photo Theme: Botanic Photography

The I Ching Complete, Hexagram by Hexagram with Floral Photography related to each entry.

The I Ching by James Legge, tr. Sacred Books of the East, vol 16, 1899

The Sung Hexagram

Sung intimates how, though there is sincerity in one’s contention, he will yet meet with opposition and obstruction; but if he cherish an apprehensive caution, there will be good fortune, while, if he must prosecute the contention to the (bitter) end, there will be evil. It will be advantageous to see the great man; it will not be advantageous to cross the great stream.

  • 1. The first SIX, divided, shows its subject not perpetuating the matter about which (the contention is). He will suffer the small (injury) of being spoken against, but the end will be fortunate.
  • 2. The second NINE, undivided, shows its subject unequal to the contention. If he retire and keep concealed (where) the inhabitants of his city are (only) three hundred families, he will fall into no mistake.
  • 3. The third SIX, divided, shows its subject keeping in the old place assigned for his support, and firmly correct. Perilous as the position is, there will be good fortune in the end. Should he perchance
  • engage in the king’s business, he will not (claim the merit of) achievement.
  • 4. The fourth NINE, undivided, shows its subject unequal to the contention. He returns to (the study of Heaven’s) ordinances, changes (his wish to contend), and rests in being firm and correct. There will be good fortune.
  • S. The fifth NINE, undivided, shows its subject contending;–and with great good fortune.
  • 6. The topmost NINE, undivided, shows how its subject may have the leathern belt conferred on him (by the sovereign), and thrice it shall be taken from him in a morning.

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The I Ching: Khien Hexagram The I Ching: Khwân Hexagram The I Ching: Kun Hexagram The I Ching: Mang Hexagram The I Ching: Hsü Hexagram

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The I Ching: Hsü Hexagram

Photo Theme: Botanic Photography

The I Ching Complete, Hexagram by Hexagram with Floral Photography related to each entry.

The I Ching by James Legge, tr. Sacred Books of the East, vol 16, 1899

The Hsü Hexagram

Hsü intimates that, with the sincerity which is declared in it, there will be brilliant success. With firmness there will be good fortune; and it will be advantageous to cross the great stream.

  • 1. The first NINE, undivided, shows its subject waiting in the distant border. It will be well for him constantly to maintain (the purpose thus shown), in which case there will be no error.
  • 2. The second NINE, undivided, shows its subject waiting on the sand (of the mountain stream). He will (suffer) the small (injury of) being spoken (against), but in the end there will be good fortune.
  • 3. The third NINE, undivided, shows its subject in the mud (close by the stream). He thereby invites the approach of injury.
  • 4. The fourth SIX, divided, shows its subject waiting in (the place of) blood. But he will get out of the cavern.
  • 5. The fifth NINE, undivided, shows its subject waiting amidst the appliances of a feast. Through his firmness and correctness there will be good fortune.
  • 6. The topmost SIX, divided, shows its subject entered into the cavern. (But) there are three guests coming, without being urged, (to his help). If he receive them respectfully, there will be good fortune in the end.

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The I Ching: Khien Hexagram The I Ching: Khwân Hexagram The I Ching: Kun Hexagram The I Ching: Mang Hexagram

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The I Ching: Mang Hexagram

Photo Theme: Botanic Photography

The I Ching Complete, Hexagram by Hexagram with Floral Photography related to each entry.

The I Ching by James Legge, tr. Sacred Books of the East, vol 16, 1899

The Mang Hexagram

Măng (indicates that in the case which it presupposes) there will be progress and success. I do not (go and) seek the youthful and inexperienced, but he comes and seeks me. When he shows (the sincerity that marks) the first recourse to divination, I instruct him. If he apply a second and third time, that is troublesome; and I do not instruct the troublesome. There will be advantage in being firm and correct.

  • 1. The first SIX, divided, (has respect to) the dispelling of ignorance. It will be advantageous to use punishment (for that purpose), and to remove the shackles (from the mind). But going on in that way (of punishment) will give occasion for regret.
  • 2. The second NINE, undivided, (shows its subject) exercising forbearance with the ignorant, in which there will be good fortune; and admitting (even the goodness of women, which will also be fortunate. (He may be described also as) a son able to (sustain the burden of) his family.
  • 3. The third SIX, divided, (seems to say) that one should not marry a woman whose emblem it might be, for that, when she sees a man of wealth, she will not keep her person from him, and in no wise will advantage come from her.
  • 4. The fourth SIX, divided, (shows its subject as if) bound in chains of ignorance. There will be occasion for regret.
  • 5. The fifth SIX, divided, shows its subject as a simple lad without experience. There will be good fortune.
  • 6. In the topmost NINE, undivided, we see one smiting the ignorant (youth). But no advantage will come from doing him an injury. Advantage would come from warding off injury from him.

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The I Ching: Khien Hexagram The I Ching: Khwân Hexagram The I Ching: Kun Hexagram

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