The I Ching: Lî Hexagram

Photo Theme: Botanic Photography

The I Ching Complete, Hexagram by Hexagram with Floral Photography related to each entry.

The I Ching by James Legge, tr. Sacred Books of the East, vol 16, 1899

The Lî Hexagram

(Lî suggests the idea of) one treading on the tail of a tiger, which does not bite him. There will be progress and success.

  • 1. The first NINE, undivided, shows its subject treading his accustomed path. If he go forward, there will be no error.
  • 2. The second NINE, undivided, shows its subject treading the path that is level and easy;–a quiet and solitary man, to whom, if he be firm and correct, there will be good fortune.
  • 3. The third SIX, divided, shows a one-eyed man (who thinks he) can see; a lame man (who thinks he) can walk well; one who treads on the tail of a tiger and is bitten. (All this indicates) ill fortune. We have a (mere) bravo acting the part of a great ruler.
  • 4. The fourth NINE, undivided, shows its subject treading on the tail of a tiger. He becomes full of apprehensive caution, and in the end there will be good fortune.
  • 5. The fifth NINE, undivided, shows the resolute tread of its subject. Though he be firm and correct, there will be peril.
  • 6. The sixth NINE, undivided, tells us to look at (the whole course) that is trodden, and examine the presage which that gives. If it be complete and without failure, there will be great good fortune.

VCrown©2010

Links to Hexagrams:

Khien Hexagram Khwan Hexagram Kun Hexagram Mang Hexagram Hsu Hexagram Sung Hexagram Sze Hexagram Pi Hexagram

You can follow VCrown work at: FlickrTwitterFacebookVimeo

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*